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Posts Tagged ‘Protests’

Baltimore a sign of crisis in America

March 7, 2011 Leave a comment

Leonard Gray used to leave his house in Baltimore every day to come to the Inner Harbor. It was a job, a living and a piece of Baltimore’s million-dollar revival. Until one day, Gray and the other 160 employees of Disney’s ESPN Zone were laid off.

“I worked here at ESPN Zone for six years and without notice they gave us the ax, they threw us out like we was just some paper cups,” Gray said.

That’s how Leonard joined the ranks of Baltimore’s unemployed – it’s a crowded place with 11.4 percent of the city’s residents.

“Right now, I’m struggling to survive, struggling to pay my bills, sometimes I can’t go to the market to eat,” Gray said.

But business is booming in the Inner Harbor, a luxury retail and dining district that the city has sunk millions into and made its model of economic development.

“People think that the Inner Harbor is a happy-go-lucky place, but they don’t know what’s going on behind the scenes. People are being disrespected, people are getting unfair wages,” said Gray.

Like much of America–where the richest 20 percent own 84 percent of the wealth–Baltimore’s harbor is split along class lines, said Luis Larrin, a labor organizer with the grassroots United Workers organization.

“The workers who work in these restaurants can’t even eat what they’re cooking because they’re charged the same price,” Larrin said. “$7.00 for a hamburger, an hour’s wage. They could never even think of bringing their families to spend the day here.”

It’s also split along racial lines, said sociologist and Professor Kris Marsh.

“You can say it’s a class thing, but ironically enough most of the people who are pushed out by this new development happen to be blacks, or happen to be Latinos,” said Marsh.

Just a few blocks East or West of the Harbor, the reality is much different–a city crumbling under the weight of foreclosures and crushing economic crisis.

It was against this backdrop that President Obama announced 1.1 trillion dollars in cuts to the budget last month. On the domestic spending chopping block were 13.9 billion dollars in cuts to food stamp programs, which about 530,000 Maryland depend on. Maryland has seen a 32 percent increase since in food stamp recipients since 2008.

Currently, 20 percent of Baltimore residents live below the poverty line–six percent more than when Obama stopped here days before his inauguration in 2009.

“This is what I believe, Baltimore, but you made this belief real. You proved once more the people who love this country can change it,” US President Barack Obama told a massive crowd gathered in 2009, days before his inauguration.

But residents in these blocks and blocks of abandoned row-houses told us that they haven’t been able to change the spreading poverty threatening to engulf more and more of Baltimore.

Ylan Mui, a staff writer for the Washington Post explained the system of capitalism creates a byproduct of inequality; it’s how the system is structured.

“The question becomes, what are the social implications of that?” she said. “What are the economic implications of that? Does such a large amount of wealth being concentrated among the top tiers of American households, does that simulate economic growth, does that trickle down to other economic classes? What we are really grappling with is not necessarily the fact of income inequality, but the magnitude of income inequality.”

Across the world and in the US food prices have been rising, further impacting lower income earners, a growing group in the US.

“Lower income households spend a large portion of their income on food, on these basic necessities. That leaves them less money to spend on discretionary items, which is one thing that actually helps drive the economy,” Mui said.

She explained it is important to think about the impact of food on consumers when measuring economic growth and costs. Necessity items are where most is spent for low income earners, and these items do not contribute to economic growth in the same was as other products.

“Income inequality needs to be rectified,” she added. “There is a growing recognition that it is a problem.”

U.S. With Corporate Media Tries To Lead Iran Protests

February 19, 2011 Leave a comment

Hillary Clinton had instantly recognized them by referring to them as the Iranian “opposition” a few months ago: “We continue talking with them and supporting the opposition.” The same government that, in the words of Juan Gelman, had so many ups and downs against the protests against the government of their ally Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, now they have thrown themselves into the effort to head up support to those who are allegedly fighting the government in Tehran, granting them a semblance of legitimacy.

by Iroel Sánchez

Rebellion

Hillary Clinton had instantly recognized them by referring to them as the Iranian “opposition” a few months ago: “We continue talking with them and supporting the opposition.” The same government that, in the words of Juan Gelman, had so many ups and downs against the protests against the government of their ally Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, now they have thrown themselves into the effort to head up support to those who are allegedly fighting the government in Tehran, granting them a semblance of legitimacy.

Towards this end, the U.S. State Department has opened a Twitter account USAdarFarsi to encourage those who do what America wants. Quickly, in an instant, the mainstream Western media, for example, the Spanish press started talking about repression in the Iranian capital, showing images of a burning trash can they call a “barricade” (El País–The Country), and a video in which a small group People burn a blanket on a busy road to the indifference of passing drivers (Público–Public) which was used to talk about victims of firearms.

Once again the technique of self-fulfilling prophecy begins to operate from the media against U.S. enemies, announcing in advance what the White House wants to happen. In this case, the goal is to divert the anti-imperialist and popular rebellion in the Middle East against the main enemy of the United States and Israel in the area and prevent the fire from reaching regimes such as Morocco and Saudi Arabia, faithful servants of the Empire.

And not only is the United States acting in this case, the consul of the Spanish government in Tehran who was weeks ago so reluctant to investigate and condemn the Moroccan regime’s crimes against the Saharawi people, spent four hours at a police station in Iran “after being stopped when I strolled through the center of Tehran while the ‘protests’ were taking place “…

Much ado about nothing, the U.S. is desperate to deflect attention. See the picture showing the “thousands” of demonstrators, and this is just Tehran. The rest of the country is, well, er. quietly living in peace. University of Tehran Professor Seyed Mohammad Marandi said no more than “a few hundred rioters” were in downtown Tehran.

However, just survey the western corporate media. Being dusted off are the stories that failed so miserably not long ago, trying to push Washington’s agenda.

The Empire is now determined to even the score in the Middle East, by generating displays of mass discontent to bring down a U.S. adversary in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Obama’s National Security Advisor, Tom Donilon, issued an official, White House letterhead statement, declaring as a matter of U.S. policy that Iran must allow protests of whatever sort the Obama Administration wishes to encourage.

In other words, they will try to “get something going” in Iran. The administration will fail, and the spectacle will be disheartening for them.

Did somebody say “demonstrators” for hire?

Here’s looking forward to seeing them fall on their faces once again. It’s over…

U.S. with corporate media tries to lead Iran protests

Unrest in Arab countries: Yemenis stage new protests, demand president leave office

February 15, 2011 Leave a comment

At least 3,000 protestors gathered on Monday on the streets of Yemen’s capital Sanaa in a hopes of repeating the success of the recent revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia and to oust their long-standing President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

Clashes between pro- and anti-government protestors ensued on the streets. The two sides threw rocks at each other and brandished knives and daggers, eyewitnesses said. Protesters chanted “Down, down with Ali, long live Yemen!” as police formed a human shield to keep crowds from spreading and dividing the two sides.

Mass upheavals, the first large-scale public challenge to Saleh during his rule, broke out in Yemen in late January when tens of thousands of Yemenis took to the streets in Sanaa demanding the end of his 32-year regime.

In early February, Saleh said he would not seek to run in 2013 when his presidency expires and his son would not succeed him as president.